Mar 3, 2008

Congenital Inguinal Hernia/ Hydrocele


Congenital inguinal hernia or hydrocele is because of the patent processus vaginalis. Processus vaginalis is the tract, which extends from groin to the scrotal sac. After birt, this tract gets fused. If this processus vaginalis remains patent then hernia or hydrocele develops. If the tract is wide enough to allow the intestines then hernia develops but if the tract is narrow which allow only fluid then hydrocele develops.

In case of hernia, the parents usually notice the bulge limited to the groin or extending into scrotal sac. This swelling comes after straining, crying, jumping, playing & reduces spontaneously or after lying down. It is not painful. In case of hydrocele, the swelling is limited to the scrotum & it does not reduces.The size remains almost same.

The diagnosis is by simply clinical examination and does not require any special test.

The management of hernia and hydrocele differs.In cases of hydrocele, one can wait till one year of age as there is chance of spontaneous regression while in case of hernia, the child needs to be operated as early as possible as there are chances of obstruction. The best person to treat this type of cases is the surgeons who are specialized in paediatric surgery.The operation can be done as a day care surgery or will require one day hospitalization. It is done under general anaesthesia and the child can be fed 4 hours after surgery.

13 comments:

jonalyn said...

my just turned 3 year old son has a hydrocele according to a pediatrician...but I was perflexed because I could see that my son usually touches his testicle and the pediatrician suggested that we just have to go back for her further diagnoses if the bulge of the testicle will still be there after a year. Isn't it that long to wait? should I consider other opinion. By the way, the pediatrician is not a pediatric surgeon, and confirming that it was a hydrocele on the right testicle, she uses transillumination...My son's testicle will become smaller sometimes when he feels cold or after taking a bath..but the bulge is still there...please enlighten me....I am really afraid for my son's condition

Surgeon said...

If the child is 3 yr old then you should get him operated by a pediatric surgeon. In case of hydrocele, the waiting period for spontaneous regression is only up to 1 yr of age.

manny said...

Hi im 24 years old I know im not a baby but maybe some can help me. I just found out I have a hydrocele on my left testicle and my question is, if surgery is the only option? Im really afraid cus there are risks. please some one help me .. thanks

C.C. said...

LOTTA GOOD YOUTUBE VIDS YOU CAN LOOK AT THAT WILL HELP

july del toro said...

i'm 24 and have hernia since i was a child... i just searched and found out that hernia surgery cost PhP86,360.06 i just said to myself OMG! i can't afford that big amount of money. i've been sending emails to some organizations, trying my luck they might help me with my condition. i really want to live a normal life. please anyone could help me? maayong gabii!

Leo Voisey said...

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978

Leo Voisey said...

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978

Leo Voisey said...

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978

Leo Voisey said...

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978

James Bostrom said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFiW26MHfQ&feature=player_embedded#t=0s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfSOmij8tfk&feature=youtu.be
Over the past year, CCSVI Clinic and its researchers and specialists have been studying the Combination venoplasty/autologous stem cell infusion protocol developed by Regenetek Cellular Technologies with the collaboration of outside labs and bioproducts manufacturers. As laboratory techniques gain ever-increasing sophistication based on new scientific methodologies for enhancing somatic cells into preferred lineages in vitro, the therapeutic outcomes for patients with neurological disorders have also been improving. Deb O’Connell who was treated at the Clinic in mid-September, 2012 recovered so quickly from her serious long-term degenerative disease condition that she experienced a wave of improvements while still in the hospital.
It’s a matter of medical record that Deb had been wheelchair bound for 10 years (completely non-ambulatory) with multiple co-morbidities when she entered the program on September 9; she was 9.5 on the EDSS scale as assessed by a neurologist, was down to 80 lbs in body weight, could not breathe effectively, speak, or take in food by mouth due to dysphagia. Her pain was chronic and significant. When she left the Clinic on September 24th , she walked out of the doors and into a waiting van to go to the airport. At the time of her discharge from the Clinic, she could breathe normally, effectively speak once again, eat any types of food she desired and her pain had all but disappeared. At the time of this writing she is back home in Canada and reports that she continues to recover (especially her contractured hands), shows no signs of new disease symptoms, and has gained 18 lbs since her therapies, less than 3 weeks ago. She has now begun a regular physiotherapy program and is gaining walking strength and balance. The recapitulation of the course of her disease (MS) within days, provides evidence that the in vitro requirement of cell pluripotency has correctly been identified with respect to adult cell source origin, time, and manipulation in culture. http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=1084
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFiW26MHfQ&feature=player_embedded#t=0s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfSOmij8tfk&feature=youtu.be

James Bostrom said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFiW26MHfQ&feature=player_embedded#t=0s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfSOmij8tfk&feature=youtu.be
Over the past year, CCSVI Clinic and its researchers and specialists have been studying the Combination venoplasty/autologous stem cell infusion protocol developed by Regenetek Cellular Technologies with the collaboration of outside labs and bioproducts manufacturers. As laboratory techniques gain ever-increasing sophistication based on new scientific methodologies for enhancing somatic cells into preferred lineages in vitro, the therapeutic outcomes for patients with neurological disorders have also been improving. Deb O’Connell who was treated at the Clinic in mid-September, 2012 recovered so quickly from her serious long-term degenerative disease condition that she experienced a wave of improvements while still in the hospital.
It’s a matter of medical record that Deb had been wheelchair bound for 10 years (completely non-ambulatory) with multiple co-morbidities when she entered the program on September 9; she was 9.5 on the EDSS scale as assessed by a neurologist, was down to 80 lbs in body weight, could not breathe effectively, speak, or take in food by mouth due to dysphagia. Her pain was chronic and significant. When she left the Clinic on September 24th , she walked out of the doors and into a waiting van to go to the airport. At the time of her discharge from the Clinic, she could breathe normally, effectively speak once again, eat any types of food she desired and her pain had all but disappeared. At the time of this writing she is back home in Canada and reports that she continues to recover (especially her contractured hands), shows no signs of new disease symptoms, and has gained 18 lbs since her therapies, less than 3 weeks ago. She has now begun a regular physiotherapy program and is gaining walking strength and balance. The recapitulation of the course of her disease (MS) within days, provides evidence that the in vitro requirement of cell pluripotency has correctly been identified with respect to adult cell source origin, time, and manipulation in culture. http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=1084
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFiW26MHfQ&feature=player_embedded#t=0s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfSOmij8tfk&feature=youtu.be

We Care India said...

Heart Valve Surgery in India is a good option for you because it is available at various corporate hospitals in India that are state of the art. Various medical treatments / surgeries in India are available at 60 – 70 % less price when compared to the prices in Western Countries.
minimally invasive heart surgery india
Bone marrow transplant cost in India
Inlingual hernia treatment in India
Gallbladder surgery cost India

We Care India said...

Heart Valve Surgery in India is a good option for you because it is available at various corporate hospitals in India that are state of the art. Various medical treatments / surgeries in India are available at 60 – 70 % less price when compared to the prices in Western Countries.
minimally invasive heart surgery india
Bone marrow transplant cost in India
Inlingual hernia treatment in India
Gallbladder surgery cost India